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History

“The study of History is the beginning of wisdom”.   Jean Bodin, a French economist (1530–1596).

It is the History Department’s aim to:

To ensure that all girls give their maximum academic performance through a programme of quality control

  • To insist on high standards of behaviour and presentation
  • To enable students to develop their personal, learning and thinking skills
  • To promote the development of students working collaboratively
  • To foster the development of the ability to construct arguments based on effective use of evidence
  • To develop key historical skills such as chronology, interpretation & evidence in order for students to gain a better understanding of the world around them.

All teaching groups are organised as mixed-ability classes. Central to the study of History at QEGS is the spirit of enquiry: we seek to get students asking questions about what has shaped the world in which they live.

History provides an ideal opportunity for students to develop their thinking skills. They learn to question the validity and reliability of evidence and how it is possible to have different interpretations of Historical events. They also develop the ability to construct essays and arguments. Perhaps most importantly they learn to contextualise the world around them. Interactive whiteboards are available in each teaching room. Assessment for Learning is an integral aspect of teaching and learning within the department: success criteria are shared with students, with them regularly carrying out assessment of their own work as well as that of their peers. We are also integrate the development of high levels of student literacy into our teaching and learning.

Key Stage 3

Year

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

7

What is History? (Introduction to History

The Romans (A study of a significant society in world History)

In depth study into the impact of Anglo-Saxon and Viking Migration on Britain (pre-1066 civilisations)

The development of Church, state and society in Medieval Britain, 1066-1509 (1)

The development of Church, state and society in Medieval Britain, 1066-1509 (2)

8

 (The Making of the UK) (1)

 (The Making of the UK) (2)

The Industrial Revolution 1745-1900

9

Black Peoples of the Americas

Era of WW1

20th Century World including Nazi Germany

The Holocaust

 Please note that year 7 students in 2014-15 will be following the new 2014-15 National Curriculum. Year 8 and 9 students will be following the previous National Curriculum.  In 2015-16 the year 8 syllabus will switch to the new National Curriculum and in 2016-17 the year 9 syllabus will also be changed. Therefore any pupil starting in year 7 at QEGS in 2014-15 will be following the entire new National Curriculum syllabus.

Assessment
Students are expected to complete three formal assessments per full term which will be assessed according to National Curriculum Levels. These pieces of work could take the form of a written assessment, source based exercise, research task, presentation, project or knowledge based test.

Ongoing assessment of student work is carried out by teaching staff both within class and of homework activities. The marking of extended written work will include an assessment and/or effort grade, positive comments and targets for improvement. Students books will also be regularly marked in accordance with the school marking policy and students are also encouraged to assess both their own and their peers work on a regular basis. Students are also expected to fully take part in student teacher dialogues in their books about how written work and Historical understanding can be taken further. Students will be provided with opportunities to respond to these ‘think pinks’ both in class time as well as for homework.

In addition to this there will be an end of year exam at the end of each year which the girls will be expected to revise for. The exams for Years 7, 8 and 9 will take place during the summer term. The girls will be provided with a revision booklet in advance of the exam to help them revise. There will also be shorter end of unit tests at the end of key topics taught during the year such as the Romans in Year 7 and the Black Peoples of the Americas in Year 9.

The History department also takes its commitment to improving student literacy very seriously and as such literacy is also assessed during the course of each year in terms of spelling and grammar.

To support your daughter’s learning it is recommended that you:

  • Support her with homework and help with specific research tasks whenever relevant.
  • Remind your daughter that all work should be well presented and organised and that she should take pride in her work.
  • Encourage your daughter to access additional information about the subject which can help to develop her interest, understanding and enjoyment. For example visiting museums and places of historical interest; reading historical texts whether they be horrible histories or more demanding books; at KS4 & 5 or using the internet which can provide a wealth of information relevant to the study of History
  • Recommended websites include:  http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/ and  http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/.
  • Encourage your daughter to make use of the History resources available on Fronter
  • Encourage your daughter to read and act upon the detailed feedback and targets given in the marking of her written work

Key Stage 4

History is a popular and interesting subject and the GCSE course gives students the opportunity to study a variety of topics, the majority of which they will not have studied before. In addition, History will help to develop vital skills such as analysis, comprehension, argument and presentation which are all highly valued by employers as well as by colleges and universities.

Unit 1
Development study: Medicine and Public Health in Britain c50AD to the present day
Looks at the key medical discoveries from the Romans through to the 20th Century, the individuals and developments responsible for them and their impact on society. Evaluates the development of public health through the ages.

Unit 2
Depth Study: The American West c1845-1890
Investigates how & why white Americans settled on the Great Plains and how this affected the lives of the Plains Indians as a result.    

Unit 3
Source enquiry: The Transformation of Surgery c.1845-c.1918
A study of the key developments made in surgery in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Looks at how pain, infection and blood loss were dealt with,  as well as the role of factors such as science and technology, war and communications in influencing these developments.

Unit 4
Controlled assessment: Germany 1919 – 1945
A study of the rise to power of Hitler and the Nazis as well as the establishment of a dictatorship in Germany after 1933

History KS4 at a glance

Year

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

10

The American West 1845-1890 (Unit 2)

The American West 1845-1890 (Unit 2)

Germany  1918-1939 Controlled Assessment  (Unit 4)

Germany  1918-1939 Controlled Assessment  (Unit 4)

 

11

Medicine & health through time (Unit 1) c50AD to 1900

Medicine & health through time (Unit 1) c50AD to 1900

Surgery 1848-1918 Sources unit (Unit 3)

Medicine & health through time (Unit 1) c1900 to Present Day

Revision

Name of subject: Schools History Project

Examination Board and syllabus no: Edexcel, Syllabus B (2HB01)

Assessment

All four units are worth 25% of the exam. GCSE History is now a linear exam with terminal assessment that is at the end of Year 11. The syllabus was recent updated (first teaching September 2013) by Edexcel (the exam board) and the details above and below reflect these changes. Controlled assessment has replaced coursework. Students will complete their tasks on Germany in school, under controlled conditions, in the spring and summer terms of Year 10; Students will then sit their exam papers on the Medicine, the American West and Transformation of Surgery papers at the end of the course in the June of Year 11. 

There will be mock exams for all three examined units. The American West mock will take place in the summer term of year 10. There will then be mocks for both the American West and Medicine in December of year 11, before a final Surgery Mock, which will take place towards the end of  the spring term, after this unit has been taught.

Continuous assessment will take place throughout the course via a number of revision tests and practice-examination questions that will be marked according to GCSE exam criteria.
Unit 1 Development study: Medicine and Public Health in Britain c50AD to the present day

  • This unit is assessed through a 1 hour 15 minute written examination, which contains a mixture of questions styles. There are no tiers in GCSE History. The paper has a maximum of 50 marks, with a number of extended writing questions. An additional three marks are given for SPaG (Spelling,  Punctuation and Grammar)
  • This is a knowledge based paper.
  • This module will be sat in the June series of Year 11.

Unit 2 The American West c1845-1890

  • This unit is assessed through a 1 hour 15 minute written examination, which contains a mixture of questions styles. There are no tiers in GCSE History. The paper has a maximum of 50 marks, with a number of extended writing questions. An additional four marks are given for SPaG (Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar).
  • This is a knowledge based paper.
  • This module will be sat in the June series of Year 11.

 Unit 3 The Transformation of Surgery c1848-1918

  • This unit is assessed through a 1 hour 15 minute written examination, which contains a mixture of questions styles. There are no tiers in GCSE History. The paper has a maximum of 50 marks, with a number of extended writing questions. An additional four marks are given for SPaG (Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar).
  • This is a mostly source based paper, although marks are also given for student use of own knowledge.
  • This module will be sat in the June series of Year 11.

Unit 4 Germany 1918-1939 Controlled Assessment

  • This unit is internally assessed under controlled conditions. Students complete a series of three tasks, all of which involve extended writing.
  • Part A is worth 10 marks, B worth 20 marks and Part C worth 20 marks, making a total of 50 marks
  • Part A takes the form of a historical explanation task. Part B takes the form of an enquiry in essay format which will require detailed independent research and the production of an effective bibliography to reflect this reading and research, whilst Parts C is based on the analysis, comparison, interpretation and evaluation of representations of Germany 1918-39.
  • The exact tasks to complete are different every year; for example the enquiry question in Part B is changed by the exam board on a yearly basis. Previous enquiries have included a range of topics from the rise of the Nazis to the persecution of the Jews to a discussion of the impact of the Hitler Youth and Nazi education policy on the young in Germany. Similarly, the representations are altered on a yearly basis.
  • The tasks will be marked by the class teacher and moderated both internally and by the exam board Edexcel.
  • The write up for all three parts of the controlled assessment takes places in the summer term of Year 10.

To support your daughter’s learning it is recommended that you:

  • Ensure that your daughter completes all homework tasks and hands in to her class teacher by the deadline set.
  • Ensure that your daughter carries out regular revision of work completed in class, so that when it is time to revise for a unit Module, then the work is more familiar to her.
  • Ensure that all deadlines, especially those in relation to the Controlled Assessment, are met.
  • Ensure that your daughter makes full use of the materials provided to assist her with her controlled assessment, such as the controlled assessment booklet and the sources booklet ,which will greatly assist her research the Part A enquiry.
  • Encourage your daughter to develop a wider interest in the subject. Encourage your daughter to access additional information about the subject that can help to develop her interest, understanding and enjoyment. For example visiting museums and places of historical interest; reading historical texts whether they be horrible histories or more demanding books; at KS4 & 5 or using the internet which can provide a wealth of information relevant to the study of History.
  • Recommended websites include: http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/ https://www.samlearning.com/ and  http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/.
  • Encourage your daughter to make use of the History resources available on Fronter in particular the downloadable revision booklets that are available for the examined units. These contain a wide range of revision and exam practice materials as well as a link to further past papers on the relevant section of the Edexcel website.
  • Encourage your daughter to read and act upon the detailed feedback and targets given in the marking of her written work.
  • Encourage your daughter to attend the after school revision sessions provided by the department.


Extra Curricular

The department greatly values the importance of extra-curricular activities, as a means to enhance the learning of the girls in the classroom.

A number of extra-curricular activities are available for students to participate in at KS3.  For example in year 7 the History department, as part of the Humanities faculty, is actively involved in the Humanities trip to St Albans. Every year in February we run the highly popular residential trip to the WW1 Battlefields of Belgium and France for year 9 students. The department also provides a London-based alternative for girls not going on this trip which includes museum and cinema trips. We have also had in recent years visits from a number of Holocaust survivors who have shared their testimonies with our students in year 9. We also run trips at KS4 and KS5. For example the department takes our 6th form students to a History conference in central London on Germany 1900-45, which they study at A2. These sessions are led by lead examiners on the unit studied.